Briefs: Education + Learning

The Future of Gamification

Gamification

Gamification is the addition of gamelike elements to tasks or activities in the workplace, in points of business-consumer interaction, and in people’s daily lives. It is seen as a way to increase consumer and employee engagement and enlist emotion, and thereby change behaviors or motivate people to act. Any activity that can be tracked or measured can be gamified.

Some respondents to a Pew Internet & American Life Project survey on the topic felt that gamification’s ability to engage and motivate would make it important to education, even if there are limitations to how far it might spread into other parts of everyday life.

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Millennials and Parenting: New Approaches in the Digital Age

Flickr_Michael Coghlan

The Millennial generation has delayed such traditional milestones as getting married and having children. Yet over the last decade, more than 20 million Millennials have become parents. And in the coming 10 to 15 years, tens of millions more will join them, leading to perhaps the biggest parenting generation in US history.

Soon to become the largest cohort of adults in the United States, the 80 million Millennials have been shaped by an array of forces — including the digital age, the lingering recession, and the unemployment of their teens or early adulthood — that earlier generations did not experience.

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E-Sports: The Rise of Professional Gaming

Gamergy_by artubr

In little more than a dozen years, a new spectator sport has climbed from relative obscurity to worldwide popularity, attracting the interest of millions of fans, who on average devote more than an hour a day to watching their favorite players engage in their favorite sport: competitive gaming.

Also known as e-sports, competitive gaming now features professional players vying for million-dollar prize purses, a college circuit that offers scholarships to “student athletes,” tournaments before sold-out stadium crowds, and a global viewing audience projected to surpass 140 million by 2017.

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DIY Biotech: Citizen Foresight in Science

DIYBiotech

The do-it-yourself (DIY) biotech movement includes individuals and groups who are engaged in biotechnology outside of traditional academic, government, and industrial laboratories. The Introduction 1 movement has also been described as “garage biology.”

Some participants in DIY biotech are also known as “biohackers.” In the last several years, community biotech laboratories have begun to Introduction to DIY biotech 2 emerge to support and encourage such citizen science. The first of these laboratories was Genspace, located in Brooklyn, New York.

Eye-Tracking and Eye-Control: In the Blink of an Eye

Eye-Tracking Peter_Sheik_Flickr

Poets have long declaimed that the eyes are windows to the soul. Today’s technology entrepreneurs and marketers have a more prosaic idea—using eyes, specifically the movement and behavior of a person’s eye, to gauge interest, detect health problems, and control technology.

Bolstered by this possibility—and the spread of key technologies such as cameras, sensors, and cloud computing—eye-tracking and eye-control technologies are leaving the lab and demonstrations and moving into commercial settings. This could bring about new form factors for computing, new ways to interact with the built environment, and even new artistic processes. It will also likely continue to erode current privacy levels.

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The Future of Digital Literacy: Skills for smarter digital citizens

Flickr_Juan Cristóbal Cobo

As digital life has moved from unconnected personal computers, mainly concerned with word and data processing, to a myriad of always-on, connected media devices, what one needs to know to be a successful digital citizen has evolved. Whereas once a family member may have asked for help in formatting a document, or finding a file, now he or she may seek assistance in establishing a presence on Facebook or learning Twitter etiquette.Read more…

Millennial Women at Work: Progress and Struggles in the American Workplace

flickr_ITU Pictures

The roles, opportunities, and treatment of women in the American workplace have been gradually shifting for many decades. Issues such as equal opportunity and equal pay for equal work have been addressed across several generations, yet remain unresolved. The Millennials are the latest generation to encounter these workplace hurdles. In October 2013, Pew Research Center surveyed 2,002 adults, including 810 Millennials (ages 18 to 32), asking questions pertaining to gender and work. Pew combined the results with analysis of Census data to create a picture of the roles and attitudes of men and women in the US workplace.Read more…